Campfire in a Cup

Lapsang Souchong Tea has a lovely mild smokiness that reminds me of summer evenings around a campfire. It doesn’t have robustness that other teas have, but it does have a smooth light aftertaste. I also think it goes well with Pasta. 🙂 I’d give it 3.5 stars out of 5.

When is a tea cup not a tea cup..

So, I did some tea cup collecting on the weekend. Sorry, about the dodgy images. 😦

I know, people are like why do you want so much clutter in your house? 🙂 But I would love to have a small collection of pretty tea cups for special occasions, or even just for special people, hence my collection has begun. I did find some interesting things- happens when you go to an Op shop I guess.

Score number 1: A tea cup with a filter insert! I have seen these used before and really wanted one. So I was overjoyed when I found one of my own. Usually it has a small lid that goes on the top to aid in the brewing process. Mine doesn’t have one and I suspect it is because it got broken one time. But I don’t really mind. So itching to try it out, I got out my leaf tea- green tea- and had a go. It was great! nothing beats fresh brewed tea. And its so easy to clean because its all ceramic. Just pull out the filter, tip out the tea leaves and wash as normal. That makes for a happy me!!

Score number 2: A little Japanese tea set.

I have long held a fascination for asian tea ceremonies, since I attended a wedding when I was young where the groom married a lovely asian lady and their wedding incorporated a tea ceremony. It really inspired me to research the tea ceremonies- they have such a fascinating history!

So anyway here’s my lovely little kit. I picked it off the shelf and the lid fell off and broke on the floor. I felt so bad I immediately took it to the counter and explained what happened. The woman barely lifted an eyebrow,  simply stating that they couldn’t sell it to me like that so she’d give it to me for 1/2 price. I hated the thought of them doing that, so I said I’d pay full price since I broke it. But she took $1.00 off anyway.  I’m excited to use it, and I can’t wait to create a Japanese woodland garden where I can sit and sip green tea out of the tiny cups. 🙂 Maybe I’ll bring my nieces and nephew with me and we can have a little tea party.

Score number 3: A silver spoon! I absolutely love silver spoons. I’m not sure why, perhaps its the elegance I associate with them. Anyway, at a different place I was looking through some of the thrifted goods at the back of the group of markets, I was actually on the hunt for some pretty beads for some jewelry projects. I found numerous silver spoons in amongst the old cutlery. I was a little astounded that they didn’t realise they were silver. So anyway, I got this cute little silver tea spoon. I spent ages studying the engraved pattern on it. I might see if I can find anything about the pattern and whether it has any significance.

Finally, I found some plain tea cups and saucers at the Op shop. These are for a future craft project. But when I was searching through them all I started to ask the question ‘When is a tea cup not a tea cup?’

What exactly makes something a tea cup, compared to a coffee mug?

So here’s what I’m thinking. There are two elements to the make up of a tea cup in my opinion.

The first thing is the curve of the handle. This is an essential part of the anatomy of a tea cup. If it looks like half a heart, it’s probably a tea cup. If it looks like an oval or a circle its a coffee mug. 🙂

The other element, which in my opinion defines a tea cup is its curves. 🙂  It should have a fluted top for ease of sipping, and an S-shaped curved body, to hold all that tea goodness.

I understand this doesn’t exactly hold up when you consider asian tea cups, but if you are ever faced with trying to buy a proper tea cup compared to a coffee mug, there’s some tips. 🙂